Healthy Homemade Dog Food: Raw Dog Food Recipes (2024)

Table of Contents
Alfalfa Sprouts Ok in moderationRaw Arugula Ok in moderationRaw Asparagus Healthy for dogsRaw Avocado Ok in moderationRaw Basil Healthy for dogsRaw Bok Choy Ok in moderationRaw or Blanched Broccoli Healthy for dogsRaw Brussel Sprouts Ok in moderationBlanched Cabbage Ok in moderationBlanched Carrot (Root) Ok in moderationRaw or Cooked Carrot Tops Healthy for dogsRaw Cauliflower Ok in moderationBlanched Celery Healthy for dogsRaw Cilantro Healthy for dogsRaw Cinnamon Ok in small amountsRaw Dandelion Leaves Healthy for dogsRaw Dill Healthy for dogsRaw Garlic Ok in small amountsRaw Ginger Root Ok in small amountsRaw Green Beans Healthy for dogsRaw or Blanched Green Peas Healthy for dogsRaw Kale Ok in moderationRaw or Blanched Kelp & Kombu Seaweed Healthy for dogsRaw Lentils Ok in small amountsCooked Mint Healthy for dogsRaw Mushrooms (not wild) Healthy for dogsCooked Parsley Healthy for dogsRaw Pumpkin Must be cookedCooked Quinoa Ok in small amountsCooked Radish Spicy flavorRaw or Cooked Rainbow Chard Healthy for dogsRaw or Blanched Red Beets Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Red Lettuce Healthy for dogsRaw Rice Ok in small amountsCooked Romaine Lettuce Healthy for dogsRaw Seaweed Healthy for dogsRaw Spring Greens Healthy for dogsRaw Sprouted Seeds Healthy for dogsRaw Squash Must be cookedCooked Sweet Potatoes Healthy for dogsCooked Turmeric Root Ok in small amountsRaw or Cooked Wheatgrass Healthy for dogsRaw Yams Must be cookedCooked Zucchini Healthy for dogsRaw or Blanched Alpaca Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Beef Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Bison Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Buffalo Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Chicken Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Cooked Eggs Healthy for dogsCooked Deer Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Duck Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Elk Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Emu Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Goat Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Goose Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Kangaroo Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Lamb Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Llama Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Mackerel Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked Moose Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Mutton Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Ostrich Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Pheasant Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Pork Ok in moderationCooked Quail Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Rabbit Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Raw Eggs Ok in small amountsRaw Reindeer Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Salmon Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked Sardines Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked Tongue Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Tripe Ok in moderationRaw or Cooked Trout Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked Turkey Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Venison Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked Ribs in General Healthy for dogsRaw Chicken Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Chicken Wings Healthy for dogsRaw Duck Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Goat Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Goose Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Lamb Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Lamb Necks Healthy for dogsRaw Lamb Shanks Healthy for dogsRaw Ostrich Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Pheasant Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Quail Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Rabbit Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Turkey Bones Healthy for dogsRaw Venison Bones (no large shanks) Healthy for dogsRaw Brain Healthy for dogsRaw Gizzards Healthy for dogsRaw Heart Healthy for dogsRaw Kidney Healthy for dogsRaw Liver Ok in moderationRaw Lung Healthy for dogsRaw Pancreas Healthy for dogsRaw Spleen Healthy for dogsRaw Tripe Ok in moderationRaw Share with a Friend: Bookmark your recipe: Did we miss something? Request a new ingredient! Thanks for submitting an ingredient! Share this widget on your website: Please enter your email to have 's recipe emailed straight to your inbox: Please enter your name and email to signup for our newsletter. Please enter your name and email to signup for our newsletter. Here is 's meal plan PDF: Your recipe for has been sent to your email. What are Preselected Ingredients? Meat, veggie, bone, and organ proportions Disclaimer FeelGood Omega-3 Oil GutSense Pre + Probiotics SoulFood Multivitamins GreenMin Minerals & Amino Acids More Meat ingredients: More Veggie ingredients: More Organ ingredients: More Bone ingredients: Ingredients List: Request a new ingredient Recipe Maker Introduction Why a Raw Food Diet For Dogs is the Best Dog Food Choice Recipe Maker Demonstration Natural Nutrient Cycle FAQs References

Alfalfa Sprouts Ok in moderationRaw

Sprouts should be at least 3 -4 days post sprouting. They are neutral, nor cooling or warming. They benefit to the kidneys, digestive tract and detoxify the body.

Arugula Ok in moderationRaw

Arugula is a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin K, and folate. Feed in moderation as arugula is goitrogenic, meaning it can disrupt the process of production of thyroid hormones.

Asparagus Healthy for dogsRaw

Asparagus is a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, iron, copper and manganese. The functions of thiamine include metabolism of carbohydrates, maintenance of normal growth and transmission of nerve impulses. It is also known to be beneficial for kidney health and has a cooling effect.

Avocado Ok in moderationRaw

Contains persin, a fungicidal toxin, that can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs if ingested in large amounts. Some people are concerned about the possibility of a negative effect on cardiac muscle which has not been yet confirmed.

Basil Healthy for dogsRaw

Basil is a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin K and manganese. Dogs need manganese to produce energy, metabolize protein and carbohydrates, and to make fatty acids. Basil has an energetically warming effect to the body.

Bok Choy Ok in moderationRaw or Blanched

Bok choy is a good leafy green containing fibre, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, and beta-carotene. It should be served chopped or blended and mixed in the meat. Bok Choy has an energetically cooling effect.

*Avoid or feed in moderation if your dog is hypothyroid.

Broccoli Healthy for dogsRaw

Broccoli is high in many nutrients: vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and manganese and dietary fibre. It also contains pantothenic acid that benefits the skin.

🏆 Broccoli is also rich in sulforaphane which deserves a special attention as it has anti-cancer, anti-oxidant and detoxing properties.

🐶 How to feed: When you add broccoli intro your dog's diet, chop it up finely as it increases sulforaphane content. Raw broccoli is preferred over streamed or cooked.

⚠️ Common concerns: Some people believe that broccoli can reduce the thyroid hormone production, however, I have never noticed this in practice. If your dog is hypothyroid, do not feed broccoli and cruciferous vegetables in large amount.

☯️ Thermal nature of broccoli is cooling. This vegetable is especially good on hot summer days or for dogs that prefer to be cool. However, it can be added in diet of all dogs due to the general nutritional health benefits.

Brussel Sprouts Ok in moderationBlanched

Brussel sprouts are a great source of dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6, folate, potassium, and manganese. Vitamin B-6 is associated with the manufacturing of red blood cells, healthy brain processes and the wellness of both the immune and nervous systems.

Brussel sprouts are goitrogenic, as they inhibit the body’s ability to use iodine. Do not feed Brussel sprouts if your dog is hypothyroid.

Cabbage Ok in moderationBlanched

Cabbage is an excellent source of dietary fibre and high in vitamin C, vitamin K, folate and manganese. It is rich in sulfur, has an anti-parasitic effect and helps patients who have stomach and duodenal ulcers. Cabbage is goitrogenic, as it inhibits the body’s ability to use iodine. Do not feed cabbage if your dog is hypothyroid. Energetically, cabbage has a cooling influence.

Carrot (Root) Ok in moderationRaw or Cooked

While carrots are rich in vitamin A and other nutrients, they should be fed in moderation especially in the raw form as dogs do not digest carrots very well. They can be fed raw or cooked.Learn more

Carrot Tops Healthy for dogsRaw

Carrot tops are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, calcium, and iron. The benefits of these greens include their healthy impact on immunity, bone density, eye health, circulation, kidney function, blood pressure, and digestion.

Cauliflower Ok in moderationBlanched

Cauliflower is a good source of vitamin C, vitamin K and folate. A deficiency in vitamin B9 or folate in pregnant dogs can cause birth defects in their puppies. TCM considers this vegetable as having cooling effects upon the body. Cauliflower is goitrogenic, as it inhibits the body’s ability to use iodine. Do not feed cauliflower if your dog is hypothyroid.

Celery Healthy for dogsRaw

Celery is a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, potassium, and manganese. Celery has numerous benefits for skin, liver, eyes and cognitive health. It is high in silicon and excellent for nervous dogs that overheat and are irritable. It is known to support joint, bone and tissue health.

Cilantro Healthy for dogsRaw

Considered a warming food, cilantro is a good source of vitamin A, vitamin K and antioxidants. It is rich in chlorophyll and aids heavy metal elimination from the body.

Cinnamon Ok in small amountsRaw

Dogs eating cinnamon have had a positive effect in the treatment of diabetes. It is known to have the ability to calm down stomach and intestinal upsets. You can use small amounts of cinnamon in your dogs food in a similar way you would use it in your diet. Traditional Chinese Medicine regards cinnamon as a warming food.

Dandelion Leaves Healthy for dogsRaw

Dandelion leaves are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, potassium and manganese. Potassium is necessary for the proper functioning of enzymes, muscles, and nerves. It is also necessary to maintain a proper fluid balance throughout the body. Dandelion greens are energetically cooling. They are readily available, however, care must be taken to harvest in areas away from roadways or where herbicides have been sprayed.

Dill Healthy for dogsRaw

Fresh dill weed is a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and manganese.

Garlic Ok in small amountsRaw

There are both positive and negative effects associated with garlic. Some of the benefits are: prevention of blood clots, widening blood vessels, stimulating the lymphatic system and anti-fungal, anti-parasitic and anti-tumor properties. Because it is part of the onion family, large amounts of garlic may cause sickle cell anemia. According to TCM, garlic has a warming effect.

Please note that Akitas and Shiba Inus are more sensitive and should not be getting even small amounts of garlic. Be aware that garlic can interact with several types of medications and it should not be used two weeks before any scheduled surgery.

Giving 1/3 of a teaspoon per 10 lbs of body weight has been found to be a safe amount for dogs. Consult with your veterinarian if you are unsure if garlic is appropriate for your dog.

Ginger Root Ok in small amountsRaw

Ginger is excellent in aiding to break down high protein meals such as meat and aids digestion in general. It can be used as a remedy in cases of diarrhea and vomiting. It should not be used in dogs that are sensitive to heat.

Green Beans Healthy for dogsRaw or Blanched

Neutral on the food energetics spectrum, green beans are a very good source of dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, iron, magnesium, potassium, and manganese. Iron is a central component of hemoglobin and myoglobin, the molecules that carry oxygen in blood and muscles.

Green Peas Healthy for dogsRaw

Green peas are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, thiamin, niacin, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper and manganese. Adequate amounts of zinc are essential to the health of a dog’s coat and skin, ability to reproduce, and for the functioning of many enzymes that are essential to normal metabolism. Peas are a neutral food when considering food energetics.

Kale Ok in moderationRaw or Blanched

Kale is a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6, calcium, potassium, copper and manganese. Dietary sources of copper are needed for healthy bones, connective tissue, collagen, and myelin (the protective covering of nerves). Kale is also goitrogenic, as it inhibits the body’s ability to use iodine.

Avoid or feed in moderation if your dog is hypothyroid.

Kelp & Kombu Seaweed Healthy for dogsRaw

Both kelp and Kombu benefit the kidneys, possessing diuretic and anti-coagulant properties which makes them well suited in patients with heart disease. There is also a positive effect on patients with arthritis and inflammatory conditions. Additionally, there are anti-fungal and yeast inhibiting properties associated with kelp and kombu.

Lentils Ok in small amountsCooked

Lentils should be fed in moderation and not used to replace a high-quality meat protein. The canine pancreas is not great at dealing with high levels of carbohydrates, but it is incredibly efficient in digesting protein. Some people believe replacing meat protein with lentils in vegetarian dog diets may lead to cardiac damage.

Mint Healthy for dogsRaw

Mint is a good source of vitamin A, iron and manganese. Manganese is an important part of many enzymes and plays a role in the health and maintenance of bone and cartilage in joints. Mint has a cooling effect upon the body.

Mushrooms (not wild) Healthy for dogsCooked

Fresh mushrooms sold at your local grocery store including; White Button, Cremini, Portobello, Porcini, Reishi, Shiitake and Maitake are safe for dogs. Mushrooms should be cooked before feeding to aid in digestion as dogs cannot create the enzymes needed to break down the fibre and some sugars in mushrooms.Caution: There are over 100 wild mushroom species that are poisonous to dogs. Identifying toxic species of mushrooms in the forest is difficult even for those with experience. If you suspect your dog has ingested a wild mushroom while on a walk, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Parsley Healthy for dogsRaw

Parsley is a chlorophyll-rich herb that is well indicated for carnivores as it helps to detox and cleanse. It can be beneficial in cases of urinary and gallbladder stones. It is helpful in renal failure, supports the brain and pituitary gland function. It is also considered to have anti-cancer properties. Use in moderation in dogs that overheat.

Raw parsley is a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, iron, and potassium.

Pumpkin Must be cookedCooked

Pumpkin is a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, riboflavin, potassium, copper and manganese. Vitamin A supports the eyes and has been linked to decreases in certain types of cancer. It is considered to be a great digestive tonic and has warming properties. We suggest to feed cooked pumpkin only.

Quinoa Ok in small amountsCooked

Quinoa has the highest protein content from all the grains and is considered to be warming. Therefore it should not be given to dogs that have a tendency to overheat. Cooked quinoa can be added to your dog’s dietbut it should not replace a high-quality meat protein. Quinoa benefits dogs with kidney and heart disease especially if they have a tendency to be chilly.

Radish Spicy flavorRaw or Cooked

Radish is a very good source of vitamin C, folate and potassium. Most dogs do not like radish because of its spiciness. Energetically, radish is a cooling food.

Rainbow Chard Healthy for dogsRaw or Blanched

Chard or Swiss chard is a green leafy vegetable. The leaf stalks are large and often prepared separately from the leaf blade. Chard, like other green leafy vegetables, has highly nutritious leaves and is a great source of vitamins K, A, and C and are a good source of magnesium, potassium, iron, and calcium. It is generally cooling and good for dogs that overheat. It is high in chlorophyll and has detoxification properties.

Red Beets Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Beets are a good source of dietary fibre, folate, potassium and manganese. Rich in antioxidants, beets get their deep color from the betalain pigment, which has potent anti-inflammatory properties. Most dogs handle cooked or steamed beets better than raw.

Red Lettuce Healthy for dogsRaw

Red lettuce is a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin K and manganese. Vitamin K is a co-factor for many enzymes, which means that these enzymes cannot be active without it.

Lettuce is cooling in nature and contains lactucarium - a substance with sedative properties. It is rich in chlorophyll.

Rice Ok in small amountsCooked

Based on HairQ Test results, I consistently see higher arsenic values in dogs that eat rice supplemented diets. I recommend avoiding rice or feeding in small amounts because it is not species-appropriate. Learn more about feeding rice here.

Romaine Lettuce Healthy for dogsRaw

Romaine lettuce is a good source of vitamin A and vitamin K. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin essential for coagulation of blood and for metabolic pathways in bone and other tissue.

Seaweed Healthy for dogsRaw

Seaweed is generally cooling and it is beneficial for detoxing and cleansing, draining the lymphatic system and even eliminating radioactive substances from the body. It is also useful for dogs suffering from hypothyroidism as it is rich in iodine.Seaweed is also supportive for digestive problems, lung disease, and cancer.

Spring Greens Healthy for dogsRaw

Spring greens are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron. They are rich in chlorophyll and vitamins and are generally cooling, so more suitable for dogs that overheat. NOTE: Please refer to each individual plant in your spring green mix to learn more.

Sprouted Seeds Healthy for dogsRaw

Sprouted seeds are generally cooling and are more suitable for dogs that get hot.If you would like to feed sprouts to a dog that gets easily chilly, steaming them lightly is better. Sprouts are rich in vitamins and enzymes and are great to balance the liver. They are a great source of folate, iron, vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, protein and a variety of minerals.

Squash is a warming vegetable, therefore more suitable for dogs that get chilly, but most dogs can tolerate it very well. It can be used as a great food in case of diarrhea instead of rice (which is often high in arsenic).Squash and especially the seeds are also known to have anti-parasitic effects. It is a great source of dietary fibre, vitamin C, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, potassium and manganese.

Sweet Potatoes Healthy for dogsCooked

Sweet potatoes are cooling, therefore more suitable for dogs that overheat easily. They are known to strengthen the spleen and pancreas which makes them one of the most beneficial foods for dogs. Sweet potatoes are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, magnesium, potassium, copper and manganese. They are also beneficial in eye and vision support.

Turmeric Root Ok in small amountsRaw or Cooked

Turmeric has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. Scientists confirmed turmeric is a natural antibiotic in 1949. In addition, it has also been clinically proven to have anti-parasitical properties. Read on to learn more about Turmeric benefits.

Because turmeric can slow blood clotting it should not be given in the 2 weeks prior to any scheduled surgery

Wheatgrass Healthy for dogsRaw

Considered a superfood rich in vitamins, minerals, chlorophyll and digestive enzymes. It is capable of dissolving and eliminating toxins from the body. Wheatgrass is generally cooling and it is an excellent source of dietary fibre, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin K, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, iron, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium. Dogs ingesting selenium will benefit from this potent antioxidant that acts in concert with vitamin E to protect cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Yams Must be cookedCooked

Yams are cooling so more suitable for dogs that overheat easily. They are known to strengthen the spleen and pancreas which makes them one of the very beneficial foods for dogs. They are a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, magnesium, potassium, copper and manganese.

Zucchini Healthy for dogsRaw or Blanched

Zucchini is considered to be a summersquash and has cooling properties, good for dogs that overheat. However feeding too much zucchini can lead to reduced digestive capacity. It is a good source of vitamin C, riboflavin, vitamin B6, potassium and manganese. Riboflavin or vitamin B2 is important for helping dogs to absorb vitamins such as iron and vitamin B6, as well as helping your dog’s body to activate and use folic acid.

Alpaca Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Alpaca meat is considered low in calories, fat, cholesterol and has high-protein content. It is also a warming meat with regards to Traditional Chinese Medicine principles.

Beef Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Beef is a great source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc and selenium. The amount of fat will vary with the cut. Beef is a slightly warming meat and according to Traditional Chinese Medicine is beneficial to the spleen, pancreas and stomach.

Bison Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Bison is a source of lean protein as well as niacin, iron, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B12, zinc and vitamin B6 for proper brain development and function. With regard to TCM bison is considered a neutral food.

Buffalo Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Buffalo is packed with protein and is high in iron and trace mineral content. Iron is a major component of blood and helps cells to circulate oxygen throughout the body. Buffalo is also considered a neutral food with regards to Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Chicken Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Chicken is a readily available source of protein that contains a variety of vitamins and minerals. The skin can be removed to lower the fat content if needed. Traditional Chinese Medicine regards chicken as a warming food.

Cooked Eggs Healthy for dogsCooked

Eggs contain all 20 amino acids. Egg yolks are a source of choline for normal brain development and memory and one of the few foods that naturally contain vitamin D. Pasture-raised, free-range hens tend to produce eggs that contain higher amounts of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids. With regards to TCM, duck eggs are cooling, while chicken and quail eggs are neutral.

Deer Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Deer meat contains less fat, cholesterol and protein than Beef. It also has a good source of B vitamins, zinc, phosphorous and iron. Deer is considered an energetically warming meat.

Duck Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Duck is a great source of protein, iron, selenium, B vitamins, and zinc. However, the skin contains about 1/3 saturated fat and 2/3 monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat. Traditional Chinese medicine categorizes duck as a cooling meat.

Elk Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Elk is a great source of protein, niacin, phosphorus, zinc and vitamin B12 which help to keep nerves and blood cells healthy. Most game meats fall into the classification of warming meats.

Emu Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Emu meat is very low in fat and high in protein. It is a great alternative protein choice.

Goat Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Goat is a good source of phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium. Referencing TCM principles, goat would be considered a warming meat.

Goose Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

High in protein, iron, and other nutrients, goose meat is safe for dogs to eat, but only in small servings due to thehigh cholesterol and fat content. On the TCM food energetics scale, goose is neutral.

Kangaroo Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Kangaroo is a low-fat source of protein, iron, and zinc (for a strong immune system and healthy hair and nails). It is also a great source of valuable B vitamins. Kangaroo is a warming meat based on TCM food energetic principles.

Lamb Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Lamb is a great source of protein, niacin, vitamin B12 and zinc. However, it contains higher amounts of fat. Traditional Chinese Medicine considers lamb a warming to hot food which may be beneficial where there are kidney, spleen or pancreas deficiencies.

Llama Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Llama is lean meat while still having a higher protein content. It's a great alternative for dogs with food sensitivities.

Mackerel Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked

Mackerel have been found to contain higher levels of mercury compared to other species of fish. You can learn more about this here.

Moose Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Moose is high in vitamin B-3 and B-2 and is a lean source of protein.

Mutton Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Mutton meat is rich in a variety of minerals and vitamins, but is considered higher in fat content than other similar proteins.

Ostrich Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Ostrich is a great source of vitamin B6, phosphorus, zinc, vitamin B12, selenium and niacin which supports healthy cardiovascular function.

Pheasant Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

A great source of lean protein and vitamin B12, phosphorus, selenium, niacin and vitamin B6. Pheasant meat is warming.

Pork Ok in moderationCooked

Pork is often controversial when it comes to feeding it to dogs, as some people are concerned about pigs being carriers of trichinosis, a muscle parasite that can be life-threatening. Dr. Dobias recommends feeding only cooked pork for this reason. In TCM pork is considered a neutral food.

Quail Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Quail is a great source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, iron, phosphorus, selenium, and copper (maintains healthy bones, blood vessels, nerves, immune function and contributes to iron absorption). Even the smallest dogs can consume whole or halved quail for the teeth cleaning benefits. Quail is a neutral food on the TCM energetic scale.

Rabbit Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Rabbit is high in vitamin B12 and is also a great source of protein, vitamin B6, phosphorus, niacin, and selenium. Rabbit is also very low in fat which makes it a good meat for dogs with liver disease and other conditions requiring a low-fat diet. The energetics of rabbit meat is cooling.

Raw Eggs Ok in small amountsRaw

Eggs contain all 20 amino acids. Egg yolks are a source of choline (for normal brain development and memory) and one of the few foods that naturally contain vitamin D. Pasture-raised, free-range hens tend to produce eggs that contain higher amounts of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids.

Large amounts of eggs may cause a biotin (vitamin B7) deficiency as raw eggs contain a protein compound (avidin) which binds to biotin and prevents protein absorption. This is why raw eggs should be fed only in limited quantities.

Cooked Eggs are fine.

With regards to TCM, duck eggs are cooling, while chicken and quail eggs are neutral.

Reindeer Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Reindeer is low in fat and very high in B-12 along with omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids. Suitable for dogs requiring a low-fat diet.

Salmon Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked

Pollution and toxins in our oceans have reached unprecedented levels and ultimately accumulate in fish. While salmon is considered relatively low in mercury and other heavy metals, fish that live longer and are higher on the food chain accumulate higher levels of mercury. It is our experience that dogs fed fish regularly show elevated mercury levels which can lead to a variety of health problems. You can learn more about this here.

Additionally, Pacific Salmon are known to carry a parasite (Neorickettsia helminthoeca) that can cause serious illness in dogs. Freezing salmon for a minimum of 2 weeks will eliminate this parasite. Salmon is a neutral food on the TCM energetic scale.

Sardines Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked

In the past, sardines were considered healthy food. However, because they are consumed with the bones, a diet high in sardines may lead to elevated radioactive strontium levels. This is mainly due to the f*ckushima accident and the fact that Japan is one of the main sardine exporters supplying other sardine canneries around the world. Learn more here. Traditional Chinese Medicine classifies sardines as a neutral food.

Tongue Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Tongue is a good protein source and also contains zinc, iron, choline and vitamin B12.

Tripe Ok in moderationRaw or Cooked

While many dogs love tripe, it should never be considered a meat replacement. It is composed of mainly collagen and elastic fibres with only a very thin muscle layer. However, adding tripe in your dog’s diet as an ‘organ addition’ offers several benefits. Tripe provides an ideal ratio of phosphorus and calcium as well as essential fatty acids. Green (unbleached) tripe contains an abundance of healthy probiotics and enzymes if it comes from a healthy cow. Traditional Chinese Medicine regards it as a neutral food.

Trout Feed with cautionRaw or Cooked

Trout is a lean freshwater fish which makes it a low-mercury alternative if it came from clean waters. Most trout on the market are farmed, which may be problematic depending on the quality of feed and crowding levels. This is why I recommend feeding farmed fish in limited amounts and suggest wild freshwater fish from unpolluted waters. Traditional Chinese Medicine classifies trout as a hot food.

Turkey Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Turkey is a great source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, phosphorus and selenium which is important in many bodily processes including cognitive function, a healthy immune system, and fertility. Turkey is also known for containing tryptophan, an amino acid with calming and sedating effects. On the TCM energetics scale, turkey is warming.

Venison Healthy for dogsRaw or Cooked

Venison, especially wild, is a great source of protein, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron, phosphorus, zinc, and thiamin (for nerve, muscle, and heart function). It is considered one of the most species-appropriate meats for dogs. The energetics of venison according to Traditional Chinese Medicine is warming.

Ribs in General Healthy for dogsRaw

Raw bones provide a highly digestible source of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals. Be cautious about feeding beef ribs if your dog has a tendency to swallow them whole. These bones are long and may get stuck in the esophagus. If your dog is a good chewer, they should be fine.

Chicken Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Chicken bones are a common addition to a raw diet and they are easily consumed by even the smallest dogs. They are rich in minerals, particularly calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat, and collagen.

Chicken Wings Healthy for dogsRaw

Chicken wings are a common addition to a raw diet and they are easily consumed by even the smallest dogs. They are rich in minerals, particularly calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat, and collagen.

Duck Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Raw bones provide a highly digestible source of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals. Feeding bones helps make the stomach muscle layers stronger, which prevents bloat. Great for small dogs although generally, poultry necks are often too soft to clean your dog's teeth.

Goat Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Goat bones are rich in minerals, particularly calcium for building bones and teeth, as well as enabling muscles to contract, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat, and collagen.

Goose Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Raw bones provide a highly digestible source of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals. Feeding bones helps to clean teeth and makes the stomach muscle layers stronger, which prevents bloat.

Lamb Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Lamb bones are rich in minerals, particularly calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat and collagen.

Lamb Necks Healthy for dogsRaw

Lamb necks are rich in minerals, particularly calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat and collagen.

Lamb Shanks Healthy for dogsRaw

Lamb shanks are rich in minerals, particularly calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat and collagen.

Ostrich Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Raw bones provide a highly digestible source of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals. Feeding bones helps to clean teeth and makes the stomach muscle layers stronger, which prevents bloat.

Pheasant Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Raw bones provide a highly digestible source of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals. Feeding bones helps to makes the stomach muscle layers stronger, which prevents bloat. Great for small dogs although generally, poultry necks are often too soft to clean your dog's teeth.

Quail Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Raw bones provide a highly digestible source of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals. Feeding bones helps make the stomach muscle layers stronger, which prevents bloat. Great for small dogs although generally, poultry necks are often too soft to clean your dog's teeth.

Rabbit Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Raw bones provide a highly digestible source of calcium, phosphorus, and other minerals. Feeding bones helps to clean teeth and makes the stomach muscle layers stronger, which prevents bloat.

Turkey Bones Healthy for dogsRaw

Turkey bones are rich in minerals, particularly calcium, phosphorus (needed for many functions, such as filtering waste and repairing tissue and cells), magnesium, and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat and collagen.

Venison Bones (no large shanks) Healthy for dogsRaw

Venison bones are rich in minerals, particularly calcium, phosphorus, magnesium (a cofactor in more than 300 enzyme systems that regulate biochemical reactions in the body, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation), and potassium, along with amino acids, vitamins, fat and collagen.

Brain Healthy for dogsRaw

Brain is a great source of vitamin C, niacin and pantothenic acid, vitamin B12, phosphorus and selenium. It also provides a great source of omega-3 fatty acids which are often lacking in a raw diet.

Gizzards Healthy for dogsRaw

Gizzards are high in protein and contain iron, minerals, and vitamins C, E and B. Glucosamine is also found in Gizzards and can be helpful for dogs with arthritis.

Heart Healthy for dogsRaw

Heart is comprised of quality protein along with thiamin, vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, copper, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B12, iron, coenzyme Q10 and selenium.

Kidney Healthy for dogsRaw

Kidney is a great source of vitamin C, zinc, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, iron, phosphorus, copper, selenium and protein.

Liver Ok in moderationRaw

Liver is exceptionally nutrient-dense and is, therefore, an important part of any raw diet. Liver is a great source of iron, zinc, manganese, vitamin A, vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, copper selenium, and protein. Feeding smaller amounts is recommended as it will cause diarrhea if fed in larger quantities. Although the liver is responsible for filtering toxins out of the body it does not store toxins that would be harmful if ingested.

Lung Healthy for dogsRaw

Lung is a great source of riboflavin, pantothenic acid, potassium, zinc and copper, vitamin C, niacin, vitamin B12, iron, phosphorus and selenium.

Pancreas Healthy for dogsRaw

Pancreas is a great source of riboflavin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium and vitamin B12. It also contains enzymes that support healthy digestion.

Spleen Healthy for dogsRaw

Spleen is a great source of pantothenic acid, potassium, zinc, vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B12, iron, phosphorus and selenium.

Tripe Ok in moderationRaw

While many dogs love tripe, it should never be considered a meat replacement. It is composed of mainly collagen and elastic fibres with only a very thin muscle layer. However, adding tripe in your dog’s diet as an ‘organ addition’ offers several benefits. Tripe provides an ideal ratio of phosphorus and calcium as well as essential fatty acids. Green (unbleached) tripe contains an abundance of healthy probiotics and enzymes if it comes from a healthy cow. Traditional Chinese Medicine regards it as a neutral food.

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Meat, veggie, bone, and organ proportions

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Note: This window is preset for the recommended diet proportions in the course of 2-4 week period. In otherwords, not all recipes have to contain all four food groups. You can adjust proportions based on your own preference, but your dog should get the recommended proportions.

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By using the Healthy Dog Food Recipe Maker you agree to Dr. Dobias Healing Solutions, Inc, Dr. Dobias Natural Healing SRO, and any subsidiaries and/or parent companies (the Company) the use of any recipe(s) you create to promote healthy canine diet, disease treatment, and prevention. This use can be but is not limited to, publishing in a recipe book, sharing on social media or any other internal or external use as deemed fit by the Company. Personal information will not be shared or published as per our Privacy Policy.

FeelGood

Omega-3 Oil

A pure, sustainable-source Omega-3 (EFA) oil. Micro filtered, tested toxin and heavy metal free.

GutSense

Pre + Probiotics

GutSense is a certified organic probiotic that supports healthy digestion and immune system function.

SoulFood

Multivitamins

SoulFood is a certified organic multi-vitamin & organ health support for dogs.

GreenMin

Minerals & Amino Acids

GreenMin is an all natural, plant based mineral and amino acid-rich, green superfood for dogs..

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    Fish - Ocean

    Feed with Caution

    Learn Morei

    Pollution and toxins in our oceans have reached unprecedented levels and ultimately accumulate in fish. Fish that live for longer and larger fish that are higher up on the food chain accumulate more mercury. Dogs fed fish showed elevated mercury levels. You can learn more about this here.

    Mussels

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    There may be red tide issues and toxicity.

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    Cocoa

    Toxic for dogs

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    Coca contains an alkaloid called theobromine which can cause diarrhea, vomiting, seizures, irregular heart beats and constriction of arteries in dogs. A serious reaction can occur as quickly as four to six hours after ingestion.

    Corn Grains and Cobs

    Do not feed

    Learn Morei

    Dogs eating an entire cob or large pieces of it can develop an intestinal obstruction, which can be potentially life threatening.

    Note: As to the actual corn, dogs do not digest it very well. Corn on the cob is a frequent cause of intestinal obstruction in dogs.

    Eggplant

    Not safe for dogs

    Learn Morei

    Eggplant is a plant from the nightshade family and it is not suitable for dogs.

    Grapes & Raisins

    Toxic for dogs

    Learn Morei

    Grapes and raisins can be highly toxic to dogs with the potential to cause fatal kidney failure.

    Macadamia nuts

    Toxic for dogs

    Learn Morei

    Macadamia nuts contain an unidentified toxin that can cause vomiting, weakness, joint pain, hyperthermia and inflammation in dogs.

    Nutmeg

    Toxic for dogs

    Learn Morei

    May cause hallucinations and severe vomiting in large amounts and mild stomach upset could occur with small amounts.

    Onions

    Toxic for dogs

    Learn Morei

    Onions contain a toxic compound known as N-propyl disulphide. This compound causes a breakdown of red blood cells, potentially leading to development of sickle cell anemia.

    Peppers

    Not safe for dogs

    Learn Morei

    Peppers belong to the nightshade family and are not suitable for dogs.

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    Beef Marrow Bones

    Risk of Dental Fractures

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    Although popular, large beef marrow bones are not suitable for most dogs. They are too hard and dogs often fracture teeth when chewing them.

    Cooked Bones

    Dangerous - Risk of Intestinal Obstruction

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    Never feed cooked bones to your dog.

    Ingredients List: Request a new ingredient

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    Ingredient Type:

    Beef Marrow Bones Learn More

    Although popular, large beef marrow bones are not suitable for most dogs. They are too hard and dogs often fracture teeth when chewing them.

    Bread Learn More

    Cherries Learn More

    Although cherries contain some beneficial nutrients, the pits, stems, and leaves all contain cyanide, which is toxic and can cause poisoning in dogs if consumed in large quantities.

    Cocoa Learn More

    Coca contains an alkaloid called theobromine which can cause diarrhea, vomiting, seizures, irregular heart beats and constriction of arteries in dogs. A serious reaction can occur as quickly as four to six hours after ingestion.

    Cooked Bones Learn More

    Never feed cooked bones to your dog.

    Corn Grains and Cobs Learn More

    Dogs eating an entire cob or large pieces of it can develop an intestinal obstruction, which can be potentially life threatening.

    Note: As to the actual corn, dogs do not digest it very well. Corn on the cob is a frequent cause of intestinal obstruction in dogs.

    Eggplant Learn More

    Eggplant is a plant from the nightshade family and it is not suitable for dogs.

    Fish - Ocean Learn More

    Pollution and toxins in our oceans have reached unprecedented levels and ultimately accumulate in fish. Fish that live for longer and larger fish that are higher up on the food chain accumulate more mercury. Dogs fed fish showed elevated mercury levels. You can learn more about this here.

    Grapes & Raisins Learn More

    Grapes and raisins can be highly toxic to dogs with the potential to cause fatal kidney failure.

    Macadamia nuts Learn More

    Macadamia nuts contain an unidentified toxin that can cause vomiting, weakness, joint pain, hyperthermia and inflammation in dogs.

    Mushrooms Learn More

    Different types of mushrooms can contain toxins that may cause kidney and liver failure, vomiting, diarrhea, hallucination and damage to red blood cells.

    Mussels Learn More

    There may be red tide issues and toxicity.

    Nutmeg Learn More

    May cause hallucinations and severe vomiting in large amounts and mild stomach upset could occur with small amounts.

    Onions Learn More

    Onions contain a toxic compound known as N-propyl disulphide. This compound causes a breakdown of red blood cells, potentially leading to development of sickle cell anemia.

    Peppers Learn More

    Peppers belong to the nightshade family and are not suitable for dogs.

    Rhubarb leaves Learn More

    Salt Learn More

    Although dogs require sodium to maintain cellular functions like fluid balance, acid-base balance and nerve signal transmission too much can cause a change in the fluid balance of cells thus causing tremors, seizures and coma.

    Xylitol Learn More

    Recipe Maker Introduction

    If you are having trouble or experiencing issues please send us an email to: customercare@peterdobias.com

    Why a Raw Food Diet For Dogs is the Best Dog Food Choice

    A healthy raw diet for dogs started with wolves. While their behaviour may be different, no anatomist would recognize the difference between a wolf and a dog. See how a carnivores digestive tract and a herbivores digestive tract explains why the best dog food is a raw diet.

    Recipe Maker Demonstration

    If you are having trouble or experiencing issues please send us an email to: customercare@peterdobias.com

    Natural Nutrient Cycle

    Healthy Homemade Dog Food: Raw Dog Food Recipes (2024)

    FAQs

    How do I make a raw diet for my dog at home? ›

    Take any meat (chicken, beef, lamb, pork, whatever) minced or diced. Grate raw vegetables into it (anything but potato) so that it is roughly 2⁄3 meat and 1⁄3 vegetable (if you prefer, you can put the vegetable through a food processor). Get some meaty bones from the butcher and give your dog one every day or two.

    What is the best mix for raw dog food? ›

    After you've chosen a diverse set of ingredients to feed your dog, you can look at mixing the quantities. Ratios can vary from dog to dog, depending on their lifestyle, breed, age and exercise levels. Generally, we suggest feeding 80% meat and offal with 20% fruits and vegetables.

    What should top 3 ingredients be dog food? ›

    What are the top 3 ingredients to look for in dog food? The top ingredients to look for in dog food are high-quality proteins (named meat sources - chicken, beef, fish, and lamb), natural carbohydrates (whole fruits and vegetables), and healthy fats (animal fats or plant-based oils).

    What are the most important ingredients in homemade dog food? ›

    Your pet needs protein (animal meat, seafood, dairy, or eggs), fat (from meat or oil) and carbohydrates (grains or vegetables). They also need calcium (from dairy or an ingredient such as egg shells), and essential fatty acids (from certain plant oils, egg yolks, oatmeal, and other foods).

    What raw food can I feed my dog daily? ›

    A raw dog food diet typically consists of: Muscle meat, often still on the bone. Bones, either whole or ground. Organ meats such as livers and kidneys.

    Should homemade dog food be raw or cooked? ›

    When all of these factors are considered together in the question of raw vs. cooked dog food, it is clear that balanced, freshly prepared, lightly cooked whole food is the best choice for our mission to make the best healthy dog food possible.

    Can you mix cooked rice with raw meat for dogs? ›

    Can I add rice to raw dog food? It's entirely up to you if you want to add rice to your dog's raw meal. A balanced raw diet usually has all the nutrients your canine needs, so rice isn't needed to be added. However, it can act as a meal topper if your dog loves it but rest assured it is completely unnecessary.

    Are raw eggs good for dogs? ›

    Although cooked eggs can be a nutritious treat for your dog, raw eggs are dangerous. As with humans, raw eggs can expose dogs to harmful salmonella, which can then spread back to their pet parents (especially those with a compromised immune system).

    What does a raw dog food diet consist of? ›

    As the name suggests, the raw dog food diet is one which is mainly made up of uncooked and minimally processed ingredients. Raw dog food refers to a type of pet food that is made primarily from uncooked animal ingredients. It typically includes raw meat, bones, organs, fruits, and vegetables.

    What are the 3 super foods for dogs? ›

    Dog experts reveal dog superfoods
    • Sweet Potato. Sweet potato is a natural source of fiber and packed with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. ...
    • Watermelon. Watermelon is a nutritious superfood, with antioxidants, amino acids, vitamins A, B and C, potassium and magnesium. ...
    • Carrots. ...
    • Kale. ...
    • Turmeric. ...
    • Quinoa. ...
    • Pumpkin. ...
    • Chia Seeds.
    Jun 29, 2023

    What ingredient to avoid in dog food? ›

    Ingredients to avoid:
    • Corn and wheat gluten.
    • Meat and grain meals and by-products.
    • BHA (Butylated Hydroxyanisole)
    • BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene)
    • Ethoxyquin.
    • Food Dyes (Blue 2, Red 40, Yellow 5 and 6, 4-MIE)
    • PG (Propylene Glycol)
    • Rendered fat.

    What should be the number 1 ingredient in dog food? ›

    The best dog foods will always have meat as the top ingredient, and you should look for recipes that emphasize real animal proteins, rather than just meat meals. Because your dog's food should have more meat than any other ingredient, it's vital to choose a meat source that will benefit your dog's health.

    What supplements should be added to homemade dog food? ›

    What to add to homeade dog food?
    Vitamin or Mineral NameFunction
    PhosphorusWorks with calcium to support bone health
    PotassiumEssential for maintaining electrolyte balance, supports nerve function
    SodiumSupports proper fluid balance and nerve function
    ChlorideSupports proper fluid balance and nerve function
    13 more rows

    What is the correct ratio for homemade dog food? ›

    The general rule of thumb for a home-made diet for a healthy canine patient is 75% meat/15%vegetables/10% carbohydrate. Variety is the key to a healthy diet so be sure to vary your meat, carbohydrate and vegetable sources from time to time.

    Is it cheaper to make your own raw dog food? ›

    You can do things yourself cheaper and better, and all it takes is a few minutes of your time. You can find inexpensive ingredients and make your own raw dog food very cheaply.

    How to make raw dog food cheap? ›

    The most affordable raw dog food option for your pet would be to combine budget-friendly proteins like chicken and beef with bulk purchases of raw dog food, such as the bulk patties and Essential Boxes from We Feed Raw. Additionally, using raw food as a topper or base for dry dog food can help save money.

    Can I feed my dog raw meat from the supermarket? ›

    Yes, dogs can eat raw meat, but giving dogs raw meat only is not advisable. Raw food diets have grown in popularity in recent years. The surge in people embracing raw diets for dogs may stem from pet owners hoping to feed their dogs foods that more closely resemble how the dogs would have eaten in the wild.

    Can I just switch my dog to raw food? ›

    Sure! First, do it gradually—don't make the switch overnight. Second, make the meals more appealing by adding some cheese or their favorite treat. Lastly, monitor your dog's response, especially if they have a sensitive stomach.

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